Lillip and Putti

Name: Lillip and Putti
Word of the Day: lilliputian
Environment: Various prairies and meadows, in patches of flowers
Organization:
Solitary
Attacks:
Burdening foes with putti, poking with its stigma
Defenses: Lillip rely on restricting their opponent’s mobility to keep safely out of range.  When their flower patch is approached, they push enemies away with their stigma.
Weaknesses: Fire is devastating to lillip, and ranged attacks can pick them off quite easily without the need to ever approach them. Destroying their flower patch kills them.

Background: Lillip are small floral monsters that are carefree and harmless.  In certain areas, patches of flowers will bloom, giving birth to a single lillip that treats that patch as its home.  Lillip spend their whole lives watching over the patch of flowers, hiding almost invisibly within them on endless watch, using stored sunlight to keep watch during the night.

Tactics: Lillip hardly ever stray from their patch of flowers, unless something gets uncomfortably close or there is a nearby fight.  Alarmed at the proximity to their flower patch, lillip will run in and start bombarding whichever combatant they are least familiar with with dozens of small tiny pollen creatures known as putti.  Putti weigh down enemies, and multiple applications of putti can slow an enemy’s movement to a halt.  The only way to remove the putti is to shake them off by flailing around, but the burden of putti also makes it significantly more difficult to. Enemies that get close to the Lillip will be pushed back slightly with the lillip’s surprising strong tongue-like stigma.

Thankfully, lillip are entirely harmless, relying on annoyance as their key tool for survival.  A lillip can push you around, but one can never kill you, making it best to simply leave them and their flower patches alone.  If for whatever reason you need to kill off a lillip, your best bet is to either kill it with fire, snipe it from afar if you can see it through the flower patch, or simply to rush in and stamp out its flower patch, causing it to wither away.

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